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Vascular Health Lab

Doppler image
Doppler image
femoral scan
femoral scan
brachial scan
brachial scan
single-leg cycling
single-leg cycling

Mission

The research interests of our group focus on the links between vascular health, blood flow regulation and muscle function.  Our studies include a variety of techniques aimed at measuring vessel stiffness, vasodilatory capacity, endothelial function, blood flow and autonomic function in both healthy and diseased populations.

Current Projects

The list of projects below are currently in the state of data collection or manuscript preparation.

Peripheral Vascular Function in Parkinson’s Disease - 
Although it is well established that individuals with PD have autonomic dysfunction that negatively impacts blood flow and blood pressure regulation, it is currently unknown if they also have peripheral vascular dysfunction.  The goal of this current study is to determine if peripheral vascular dysfunction is present in those with PD and, if so, determine if it can be reversed with antioxidant supplementation.

Does stroke induced limb paralysis result in peripheral vascular dysfunction?

It is well established that physical activity promotes vascular health.  Following a stroke a limb can become partially or completely paralyzed limiting the limb-specific physical activity.  The purpose of this investigation is to determine if this physical inactivity results in vascular dysfunction within that limb.

Exercise modalities to improve blood flow in the lower limbs of those with spinal cord injuries.
There are multiple complications associated with spinal cord injuries that could be reversed with improved blood flow and tissue perfusion within the lower limbs.  The purpose of this investigation is to determine the efficacy of passive limb movement and upper body exercise to increase lower limb tissue perfusion in those with SCI and to determine if blood flow and tissue perfusion is moderated by the degree of autonomic control within the lower limbs.

Single-leg cycling: Implications for rehabilitation
Our recent investigation revealed that blood flow to the active limb is much greater during single-leg cycling compared to typical double-leg cycling.  As a result,  the individual can perform at a much greater limb specific workload during single-leg cycling.  This series of investigations is aimed at determining the role that single-leg cycling may have to improve performance and function in both highly trained and diseased populations. 

 

Recent Publications and Presentations

Complete list of Dr. McDaniel's Publications

 

Publications:

Burns KJ, Pollock BS, LaScola P and McDaniel J. Cardiovascular responses to counterweighted single-leg cycling: implications for rehabilitation. Eur. J. Appl. Physiol. 2014; 114(5): 961-968.

Burns KJ, Martin JC, Elmer SJ and McDaniel J.  Response to Letter to the Editor: A Counterweight is Not Necessary to Implement Simple, Natural and Comfortable Single-leg Cycle Training.  Eur. J. Appl Physiol. (In press)

Student Presentations:

Burns KJ, Pollock BS, Harper S, Peroutky K and McDaniel J. Use of passive exercise to transiently increase blood flow in the lower and upper extremities.  American College of Sports Medicine Annual Meeting, Orlando, FL, May 2014

Pollock BS, Burns KJ, Harper S, Peroutky K and McDaniel J. Skeletal muscle hyperemia and repetitive passive limb movement.  American College of Sports Medicine Annual Meeting, Orlando, FL, May 2014

Harper S, Burns KJ, Pollock BS, McDaniel J and Glickman E. The influence of lateral pedal displacement on cycling efficiency and maximal cycling power. American College of Sports Medicine Annual Meeting, Orlando, FL, May 2014

Burns KJ, Pollock BS, Ridgel A, and McDaniel J. Hemodynamic and vascular responses to handgrip exercise in Parkinson’s disease.  American College of Sports Medicine Annual Meeting, Indianapolis, IN, May 2013

Pollock BS, Burns KJ, Ridgel A, and McDaniel J. Vascular function in Parkinson’s disease patients. American College of Sports Medicine Annual Meeting, Indianapolis, IN, May 2013

Peroutky K, Pollock BS, Burns KJ and McDaniel J. Validity of handgrip exercise to study vascular function in Parkinson’s disease. American College of Sports Medicine Annual Meeting. Indianapolis, IN, May 2013

Burns KJ, Pollock BS, LaScola P, and McDaniel J. Single leg cycling: Implications for rehabilitation. American College of Sports Medicine Annual Meeting, San Francisco, CA, May 2012

Equipment

equipment in the vascular health lab

 

The vascular lab is equipped GE logic 7 Doppler/ultrasound, BMEYE nexfin beat by beat blood pressure monitor, Moor LDF2 skin Doppler flow and temperature unit, Artinis NIRS tissue oxygenation unit, ADinstruments 8 channel data acquisition unit that includes EMG, ECG and grip strength transducer, stryker stretcher, lower body negative pressure box, velotron cycle ergometer and monark cycle ergometers equipped with SRM power meter.

Contact

If you want to learn more about the vascular health lab please contact Dr. McDaniel.

jmcdani5@kent.edu or 330-672-0802